78 reporters slain in Somalia in the last two decades

According to a recent study published by Reporters Without Borders (RSF), seventy-eight journalists have been killed in Somalia in the past 20 years, making it one of the most dangerous places to practice journalism in the world.

 

A staggering total of 1,668 journalists have been killed worldwide during that same period. RSF has compiled and analyzed the figures for journalists killed in murders, contract killings, ambushes, war zone deaths and fatal injuries between 2003 and 2022.

Somalia is one of the world’s most dangerous places to practice journalism. The country has a long history of conflict and instability, and journalists often face significant risks covering sensitive issues or events in areas controlled by militant groups.

Many parts of Somalia are off-limits to reporters due to the presence of militant groups or ongoing military operations. Despite these challenges, many brave and dedicated journalists in Somalia continue to work to bring important stories and information to the public, often at significant personal risk.

One of the main challenges facing journalists in Somalia is the lack of government protection and support. Dozens of reporters have been targeted by various groups, including militant organizations such as al-Shabaab.

Globally, conflict-ridden Iraq and Syria were the most hazardous places for journalists to operate, with a combined 578 journalists killed in the previous 20 years, or more than a third of the world’s total.

It is followed by Mexico (125 killed), the Philippines (107), Pakistan (93), Afghanistan (81) and Somalia (78).

Since Russia invaded Ukraine in February, eight journalists have been slain compared to 12 reporters killed in the previous 19 years.

78 reporters slain in Somalia in the last two decades

According to a recent study published by Reporters Without Borders (RSF), seventy-eight journalists have been killed in Somalia in the past 20 years, making it one of the most dangerous places to practice journalism in the world.

 

A staggering total of 1,668 journalists have been killed worldwide during that same period. RSF has compiled and analyzed the figures for journalists killed in murders, contract killings, ambushes, war zone deaths and fatal injuries between 2003 and 2022.

Somalia is one of the world’s most dangerous places to practice journalism. The country has a long history of conflict and instability, and journalists often face significant risks covering sensitive issues or events in areas controlled by militant groups.

Many parts of Somalia are off-limits to reporters due to the presence of militant groups or ongoing military operations. Despite these challenges, many brave and dedicated journalists in Somalia continue to work to bring important stories and information to the public, often at significant personal risk.

One of the main challenges facing journalists in Somalia is the lack of government protection and support. Dozens of reporters have been targeted by various groups, including militant organizations such as al-Shabaab.

Globally, conflict-ridden Iraq and Syria were the most hazardous places for journalists to operate, with a combined 578 journalists killed in the previous 20 years, or more than a third of the world’s total.

It is followed by Mexico (125 killed), the Philippines (107), Pakistan (93), Afghanistan (81) and Somalia (78).

Since Russia invaded Ukraine in February, eight journalists have been slain compared to 12 reporters killed in the previous 19 years.

 

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